Home > IMEDS Research Portfolio

IMEDS Research Portfolio

 

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Study with Eli Lilly


Estimating the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) among patients receiving routine clinical care for RA, specifically during treatment with conventional and bDMARDs

Project Title: Risk of venous thromboembolism in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with biologic and non-biologic DMARDs
Project Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Project Status: Completed
Conditions: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Venous thromboembolism (VTE)
Summary: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder that affects the lining of a patient’s joints and causes painful swelling and joint damage. Biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) are a type of medication which may prevent the development of joint damage, including rheumatoid arthritis. Individuals with RA have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis, compared with non-RA populations based on several recent studies. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a condition in which a blood clot forms in deep veins of the body, posing a significant health risk. The purpose of this IMEDS project was to identify risk factors for VTE among patients receiving treatment with specific disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or categories of therapies. Results of the study demonstrated that for each drug class tested, age was an important risk factor for VTE and higher ages were associated with higher rates of VTE. Men also had higher incidence rates of VTE than women. This study demonstrated the collaborative possibilities in the IMEDS network to robustly characterize at-risk populations for health outcomes by leveraging claims data.

 

 

 

Oral Contraceptives and Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Pilot Study with Pfizer


Estimating the increased risk of thromboembolism (VTE) among patients using 4th generation oral contraceptives (containing drospirenine) compared to 2nd generation (containing levonorgestel)  

Project Title:  Oral Contraceptives and VTE across the Sentinel data network – An IMEDS Evaluation pilot assessment 
Project Sponsor: Pfizer
Project Status: Completed
Conditions: Venous thromboembolism (VTE)
Summary: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a condition in which a blood clot forms in deep veins of the body, posing a significant health risk. It has been well documented in scientific literature that users of oral contraceptives have an increased risk of VTE. The purpose of this IMEDS pilot project was to determine if there is an increased risk of VTE among patients using 4th generation oral contraceptives (containing drospirenine) compared to 2nd generation (containing levonorgestel). This study used the data network of nine FDA Sentinel data partners to examine the rate of VTE occurring in new users of 2nd and 4th generation oral contraceptives. The cohort consisted of women aged 15-44 who were new oral contraceptive users. Patients that were deemed to have existing VTE risks (such as cancer, chronic cardiovascular diseases, etc) were excluded from the study. The study results summarized the age, sex, and year of users and concluded that rates of VTE were higher for 4th generation oral contraceptives than 2nd generation oral contraceptives. This result is consistent with other existing scientific studies on this topic. This IMEDS pilot project demonstrated the potential of leveraging a large distributed data network to address public health issues and the value in utilizing FDA’s existing resources.

 

 

 

Drug Class Label Change Pilot Study with Pfizer


Estimating the impact of a 2010 drug class label change that warned of a potential increase of bone fracture for drug users and recommended changes

Project Title: Risk Minimization Evaluation in a Distributed Data Network – An IMEDS Evaluation Pilot Assessment of the 2010 Class Label Change for Proton Pump Inhibitors
Project Sponsor: Pfizer
Project Status: Completed
Conditions: Effectiveness of a drug label change, bone fracture, drug use
Summary: Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a class of drugs that provide the drug user with a long-lasting reduction of stomach acid production. In May 2010, the FDA implemented a class-wide label change regarding the risk of bone fracture for users. The purpose of this IMEDS pilot study was to determine if the drug label change made a significant impact on the manner in which these drugs were used by individuals, including the frequency and duration of the drug use. Using IMEDS data network, the results suggest that the length of PPI drug use, number of long-term users, and occurrence of bone fractures in users were all reduced after the drug labels were changed. The study results demonstrated that the IMEDS program and data network can be used to characterize a) drug use patterns and other outcomes (such as bone fracture decreases) and b) the effectiveness of drug label changes at the population level.